Due to vs. owing to

Posted on Tue 18 Jul 2017 @ 2.22pm UTC




LOTS of people use the phrases “due to” and “owing to” more or less interchangeably, but in many cases the use is back to front in structure.

I’m not going to give you the grammatical distinction between the two.

Instead I’ll give you the practical usage difference, which will be more helpful.

Unhappiness is usually due to ignorance of natures laws

(via 4chan)

Both due to and owing to pretty much articulate in some way to “because of” but in this manner:—

due to

Due to is in the sense of attributable to something:—

[SITUATION] + due to [CAUSE] + [RESULT]

Memory aid:— “D.C.” — “Due to Cause”

Extra memory aid:— Sentence always finishes with the ‘result.’

Examples:—

Unemployment [situation] due to automation [cause] will grow steadily [result].

Game cancelled due to rain will resume tomorrow instead.

Due to / Owing to weather, school closed for today.

We had to postpone, due to / owing to the strike going on.

Note:— We can use due to after the verb to be, but not owing to:—

  • His success was due to his parents.
  • His success was owing to this parents. (Incorrect)

 

owing to

Owing to is pragmatically the alternative of because of or on account of:—

[SITUATION] + [RESULT] + owing to + [CAUSE]

Memory aid:— If “D.C.” is due to cause, then logically “result owing to” remains.

Extra memory aid:— Sentences finishes with the ’cause.’

Examples:—

His reading was hesitant [result] owing to a stammer [cause].

(His reading was hesitant because of a stammer.)

Game cancelled today owing to rain.

(Game cancelled today because of rain / on account of rain.)

Due to / Owing to weather, school closed for today.

We had to postpone, due to / owing to the strike going on.

Note:— Owing to cannot be used after the verb to be (as shown up top).

In other words, the two phrases give the picture from opposite directions — due to gives cause then result, and owing to the result then cause.

Once you get the usage pattern right between the two, then the grammatical distinction becomes quite straightforward to work out.

words because of evil-people-quotes

(via Pinterest)


© Learn English or Starve, 18 July 2017. (B17100) Original text 17 Mar 2016.

Featured image via EAIE. All other images as indicated.

Advertisements
Tagged:
Posted in: Colour Section